Princess Marguerite Adélaïde of Orléans Princess Czartoryski Signed Letters 1868
Princess Marguerite Adélaïde of Orléans Princess Czartoryski Signed Letters 1868
Princess Marguerite Adélaïde of Orléans Princess Czartoryski Signed Letters 1868
Princess Marguerite Adélaïde of Orléans Princess Czartoryski Signed Letters 1868
Princess Marguerite Adélaïde of Orléans Princess Czartoryski Signed Letters 1868

Princess Marguerite Adélaïde of Orléans Princess Czartoryski Signed Letters 1868

Product code: 5204
£195.00
Four interesting passionate letters written between 1868 - 1869, by Princess Marguerite Adélaïde of Orléans (1846 - 1893), to Marie de Glanbily, written in French on her personal stationery, Fluer-de-Lys surmounted by a crown and also on Bushey House stationery where the French royal family lived in exile.

The Princess writes a series of intriguing letters to her friend referring to Marie in the most intimate manner, expressing her passionate love for her and informing her that the ring she gave is worn constantly around her neck. She further comments on the linden tree that they sat under and wonders who else will sit with her. All letters are accompanied by the original envelopes also hand addressed by the Princess.

Marguerite was a member of the House of Orléans and a Princess of France by birth. Through her marriage to Prince Władysław Czartoryski, Marguerite was a Princess of the House of Czartoryski. She was the third child of Prince Louis, Duke of Nemours and his wife Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, and granddaughter of King Louis-Philippe of France. She married Prince Władysław Czartoryski, second child of Prince Adam Jerzy Czartoryski and his wife Princess Anna Zofia Sapieha, on 15 January 1872 in Chantilly. He was a Polish noble, political activist in exile, collector of art, and founder of the Czartoryski Museum in Kraków.

Louis Philippe, who from 1830 to 1848 was King of the French, originally followed his father's example and supported the French Revolution of 1789. In 1793, soon after his father - Philippe Egalite, Duc d'Orleans - voted for the execution of Louis XVI, Louis Philippe left France to go into exile, eventually settling in England. He had become Duc d'Orleans after the execution of his father in 1793 and
returned to his estates in France on the restoration of the Bourbon dynasty in 1814. He became King in 1830 on the overthrow of the direct Bourbon line and was himself deposed in the revolution of 1814. He then returned to England and died at Claremont near Esher in August 1850. Many members of his large family were forced into exile and took residences in the Richmond area which had long been an established refuge for French emigres.

After the death of the dowager Queen Adelaide in 1849, Queen Victoria lent Bushey House to Louis, Duc de Nemours who was the second son of King Louis Philippe. He lived there intermittently until his death in 1896. The house is now the residence of the Director of the National Physical Laboratory.

Letter 1.

"21st April 1898

My dear Marie

Your good and kind letter brought me the greatest pleasure. I know now your witing and am very happy to see it in the hands of the man who brings the letters. I thank you for your sympathy and interest you take in everything that concerns us. In the middle of our saddness and troubles I have often thought that you would be angered tp see us so unhappy. If you had been there you would have brought me tremendous help. My father has been very ill and we have had some strenuous moments. Sunday has been awful my father felt really bad and asked us to call a priest and we had worried all day although the doctor hadn't seen any actual changes. Fortunately this is all behind us now. We are completely reassured, my father is almost better and we are starting to hope that we shall be leaving soon.My brother has come back to us and his presence is a relief. It is very annoying for him as it is for everyone saddened that the wedding has been postponed, but I hope that the wait hasn't been prolonged and that soon the poor fiances will be reunited.

22nd August - We were woken up this morning by a canon blast in honour of the Bavarian Constitution anniversary, all Bavarians have to dine together and the music will play during this sumptuous dinner. The table is dressed in flowers and cakes and Mr Gooringer will stroll looking busy in his white tie. The party will end with fireworks that everyone will be able to enjoy, but for me the better day will be the day of my departure or rather the day I'll see you again.

Such happiness to find myself with you even only for some instant! I hope your visit to the dentist wasn't too unpleasant and that and that you took to your studies with pleasure - You probably, like me, have heard from Camille. The poor girl is better, but he has been rather ill and Madame de Newbroom is not well at all - It is the result of the cure! I hope that in your zeal for your studies you will not forget your promise of sending me a photograph. I'd be so happy to see you depicted as I used to see you.

Before I finsh I'd like to thank you again for the ring that I have put straight away on my chain and that is so precious to me since it belonged to you and is proof of your friendship which I am so touched by. You know mine for you and the pleasure I had in meeting you. Please send my affection to Madame your mother. My father sends his best regards to her and to give my compliments to your father. I am very glad to say goodbye rather than farewell. Goodbye, and see you soon I hope. In the meantime think of me and belive that I love you lots.

I think we will leave xxx on the 2nd and possibly xxx the 3rd. But I'll let you know the exact date and time. Blanche and Mlle Bernard send her love. Here is the fern I picked for you which I hope will give you joy because its a white one and I belive its meant to give happiness in England.

There is almost nobody left here, but the weather is magnificent but not significant to make us more joyful, however it is as beneficial. I am starting to regain courage and not be so desperate, one has to on the contrary be happy and enjoy the relief after saddnes. Everything will go well, we are in the hands of God. The hour is obliging me to finish this letter a little hurridly. However, I would still want to tell you so many things but since you know my friendship you will guess what they are without me expressing them.

My best regards to your parents and without forgetting Blanche and Miss Bernard. Farewell once again
very tenderly your affectionate

Marguerite d'Orleans

This will bring you pleasure I think to tell you that my cold has gone and that I am flourishing."

Letter 2.

"15th September 1868

My dear Marie,

Here we are finally, back from all our travels and settled as if we had never left.

Since the day when I met you at Carlsruhe everything went smoothly, we had no delays or any other important contraries. Our stay at xxx was very pleasant and we were favoured with beautiful weather and exceptional warmth. The wedding went off perfectly well, everything was arranged marvellously and the ceremony itself was very touching. Sophie was charming in her white dress and everyone who met her that day had a very favourable impression of her. My brother and her are very happy now and they deserve to be since they are such good people. We have the joy to have them here with us and to enjoy Sophie - she is so sweet and affectionate. My brother coped well with the travelling but still isn't very strong. I hope complete rest will help him fully recover.

Blanche restarts her lessons at the convent and I'm delighted to be going back to take my comfort there.

All of this doesn't make me forget my friends from xxx. I think of you often and wish to see you longer than last time. Send my love to your mother and our compliments to M. de Glambily. I ask you again to not forget me, and to send me some of your news and to believe my sincere friendship.

Yours affectionately

Marguerite d'Orleans


Letter 3.

"13th October 1868

My dear Marie,

The pleasure I had in receiving your letter goes without saying- I was awaiting it with great impatience and thank you to have finally kept your promise to give me some of your news - I hope you weren't suffering too much from the heat in Carlsruhe and especially for your mother who hates it so much. I would like to share with you the refreshing air of xxx since the sad moment of our separation I have been thinking of you constantly and don't think I can console myself from your departure.

xxx has lost all its charms for me and I am counting the days to leave. There is however a very gay society and we have a lot of noise in the evening which for peaceful people like us isn't very aggreable. We dance often, there are fireworks, but I am indifferent to all this, to read, to write, to play music and to remember the beautiful days we spent so agreeably together. It seems infintely long ince you have left and I don't think I can get used to not seeing you under the linden. Everywhere and at every instant I regret you leaving and I hope you aren't forgetting me there.

Today it's raining and cold, we are staying locked in doors or we walk fast paced in the alley to get the warmth. The Princess of xxx moved houses which she had very much desired. I met up with her almost every evening and she is very amicable. Aside from that I don't go out as much now and I don't sit on our bench anymore. It would be too sad to sit there without you!

Marguerite d'Orleans

Blanche and Mlle Bernard send their most affectionate kind messages to you. Do yo have the Life of Joan of Arc I sent you as a reminder of Marie de la xx at Rippoldsau"


Letter 4.

"20th Feburary 1869

My dear Marie,

It is so kind of you to have remembered my birthday . Although your letter increased my remorse and my regret for having taken so long to respond, however it made me very happy and touched to see that you think of me loyally.

You'd understand why I am such a bad correspondent if I told you all that I have to do and the little time I have left for me.

Even though I write many letters these are however many people who complain and with reason for not having received replies to their letters. So, I hope you won't hold it against me!

I see with pleasure that you enjoy yourself in Carlsruhe. We had such an animated life there, which I think will not stop you from throwing yourself into your work. Since you do not mention your health I believe that it is good and that you are completely cured of the pox.

As for us we did not have a winter, nor icy winds. It hasn't stopped being spring time weather and now trees are starting to have leaves and we already have lots of summer flowers. But we haven't made any project for this year. I would also be very happy if serendipity brought us together - but I don't want to raise my hopes.

The stay at xxx was very agreeable, especially, especially the charming society that we had there and it will be remembered as a very pretty souvenir. Who will stroll this summer under your linden and who will sit on your bench?

It has been so long since I haven't heard from Camille. What has become of her, if you see her send her my love.

My father continues to get better and better. He doesn't walk much still but he horse rides every day.

My brother and my sister-in-law are very well too and Blanche has grown and solidified. She goes four times a week to a convent which she enjoys and she is very happy with the other children of her age. I myself got there with the biggest pleasure to find myself surrounded by good nuns and young people whom are very kind and well brought up.

Before I finish I pray you to remind your parents of me and to send them my father's compliments

I thank you again for your affection and pray you to believe that I don't forget you either and that I am always very happy to receive news from you.

I think of you very often and I keep with care all the little memories that come from you, especially the infamous ring. I embrace and thank you again.

Your very affectionate

Marguerite d'Orleans

Mlle Bernards send your her regards"

Size: 21 x 12.5 cm approx
Product Code 5204