7th Viscount Galway Signed Letter to 5th Duke Portland 1876 Discussing Politics
7th Viscount Galway Signed Letter to 5th Duke Portland 1876 Discussing Politics
7th Viscount Galway Signed Letter to 5th Duke Portland 1876 Discussing Politics
7th Viscount Galway Signed Letter to 5th Duke Portland 1876 Discussing Politics
7th Viscount Galway Signed Letter to 5th Duke Portland 1876 Discussing Politics

7th Viscount Galway Signed Letter to 5th Duke Portland 1876 Discussing Politics

Product code: 5109
£75.00

Interesting letter written on mourning stationery, discussing local politics, dated 21 February 1876, from George Edmund Milnes Monckton-Arundell, 7th Viscount Galway (1844-1931), to William John Cavendish Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 5th Duke of Portland (1800 -1879). Galway was in mourning for his father who had died on the 6th February 1876. It is accompanied by its original mourning envelope also addressed by Galway, with a Penny Red and his black armorial wax seal on the back flap.

"Selby
Sunday

Private

My dear Duke,

I feel I must write you & xxx about the Unction.

I must now xxx that I am xxx taken by xxx!!!

I had always thought it must be a local / resident also perhaps / man, or if that was not accepted that it would be a man of some well marked position like the solicitors firm? What took place yesterday I know not, except that the mutiny departed with Mr. Heskett xxx of Leeds. I had no idea that he / Mr. W.B.D. / was even a possible candidate till I got a letter by post yesterday / somewhat characteristic of the man, coolly! / asking for my support. I have not answered this yet nor shall I till I hear more about the mutiny &co. of course it is not for me to say whether I think the constituency have xxx. xxx is not in this man. I do not feel that with my present feelings and also taking into account my position in the county, that I could do anything else than keep myself relatively aloof from this whole thing.

From his letter to me it would seem as if Mr. WB.D. had thought of coming out some time ago: but I had not the slightest idea of this, so wish to write this to you, as you might think I was not taelling you about all the possible candidates.

I shall have to answer the letter tomorrow, when I have better details about the mutiny, and will then send it to you.

Whether this choice may not had to content / which if they had chosen Col. White or the xxx xxx I don't think was so likely /, I know not, but of course you will have all other particulars from some one who was there and who would wish to know your views.

I hope you will think I have done right in writing xxx from taking any part in the matter whatever my own feelings might be, within private or with reference to this interest of the Party.

Believe me
ever yours truly

Galway

I suppose Mr. W.B.D. xxx on his xxx in the Bank, and his having married Ld Furnham's sister, as he was once my Father's colleague otherwise I should think he was quite a stranger to this xxx."

Galway was a British Conservative politician and courtier. He was the son of George Monckton-Arundell, 6th Viscount Galway, and his wife and first cousin Henrietta Maria, daughter of Robert Pemberton Milnes and sister of Richard Monckton Milnes, 1st Baron Houghton. He was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. He entered Parliament for Nottinghamshire North in an 1872 by-election, a seat he held until 1885 when the constituency was abolished. He succeeded his father in the viscountcy in 1876 but as this was an Irish peerage he did not have to resign his seat in the House of Commons. In 1887 Galway was created Baron Monckton, of Serlby in the County of Nottingham, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, which entitled him to an automatic seat in the House of Lords. He later served as an Aide-de-Camp to Queen Victoria from 1897 to 1901, to Edward VII from 1901 to 1910 and to George V from 1910 to 1920. He was also involved in local affairs and served as a Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for Nottinghamshire and as Chairman and Alderman of the Nottinghamshire County Council.

Portland was styled Lord William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck before 1824 and Marquess of Titchfield between 1824 and 1854, was a British army officer and peer, most remembered for his eccentric behavior. A recluse who preferred to live in seclusion, he had an elaborate underground maze excavated under his estate at Welbeck Abbey near Clumber Park in North Nottinghamshire.

Envelope Size: 12.5 x 10 cm approx

Product Code 5109